GOAT, Serena Williams, Says Farewell To Tennis

You don’t have to be a huge sports enthusiast to be a fan of Serena Williams.


In the 27 years since her tennis career began, Williams has ventured into fashion, investing, and so much more. And this was all while winning 23 Grand Slams singles titles - the most by any player during her era. And only one win behind Australian Margaret Court's 24 major singles titles won between 1960 - 1973.

It’s no wonder why so many of us are shocked by her retirement announcement.

I’ve been reluctant to admit that I have to move on from playing tennis. It’s like a taboo topic. It comes up, and I start to cry. I think the only person I’ve really gone there with is my therapist.” - Williams spoke with Vogue

If you watched Monday’s electrifying US Open, you saw Serena dominate in the match against Danka Kovinic. Demonstrating, as Momma Smash always does, that she’s one of the greatest athletes alive, if not the greatest.

I must say, after watching her in her element, it will be sad to see her walk away from a game she’s mastered. Yet, her difficult decision is so admirable.

“I feel like she really inspired women of color because we’ve seen a lot more women of color playing the game and I think that she’s changed the way women compete as far as it’s OK to be ferocious and passionate and vocal out there, emotional out there on the court, and still be a woman, not take away from being a woman.” - Retired tennis, star Chris Evert spoke with The LA Times

Recognizing that Serena needs to reprioritize and refocus her energies is key. Besides, this doesn’t mean she’ll never pick up a racket again.

We should all take a note, follow suit, and allow ourselves to take a step back from the overwhelming and all-consuming. Time to take a page from Serena’s book and reaffirm what our purpose is, what’s important, and what can wait.

But in the meantime, tune in and see how Serena’s final US Open turns out. And don’t forget to tune in to her new adventures off the green court.

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